If you’re ever feeling bummed by the number of followers you have, pretend that each follower is his/her own special watt. Then you can compare your follower count to the wattage of lighting instruments.
For example, you have 500 followers? Wow! Your blog is a Par-can!
575? It’s a Source Four!
1000? Dayum, son, you’ve got a 1K fresnel!
1500? Dude. You could be a mover at this point (Clay Paky spot for example) or a fog machine.
Even a blog with 15 followers gives you 15 watts of light. That’s still pretty cool.

If that fails, just switch out watts for whole instruments and start watching your rig grow. :P

Submitted by minorinawkwardness

Submitted by minorinawkwardness

Hey guys, I kind of took a break from the internet a while ago. It’s been a stressful year and this was just my way of handling it. On a depressingly personal subject, I’ve been dealing with some negative gunk for a while and just really needed a break. Thankfully, I’m beginning to see the bright side of things again and I’m feeling much better.
Anyway. I genuinely want to return to publishing on this blog. I also realize I’ve made a few other posts similar to this claiming that I would start posting again. Obviously that didn’t quite happen. Whoops.
BUT I PROMISE THIS TIME. I SWEAR ON ALL THINGS OSHA APPROVED that I have a queue box ready to go.
Thank you for your continued support and PLEASE continue to send your requests and submissions. This blog is 95% you. I’m just a button clicking organizer.

A lighting instrument disappeared from the first bay. It just disappeared. It’s gone… tech week is confusing.

wonderingwithoutreason asked: Im (co)stage manager at my high school in long island NY. i was wondering if there are job opportunities in tech theater while im still in high school

Definitely! Check out local community theatres for internship and teen programs. Most have prerequisites you will need to complete before joining and depending on the demand by the students, there may be a waiting list. Sometimes people have more luck than others but it’s all based upon different situations.

For example, I have a friend who had the opportunity to run the light board at a large private theatre when he was a senior in high school. He found his way there by job shadowing the technical director, volunteering in different departments, and finally being given a job. (For anyone interested, the job shadow happened the November of his junior year and he began working the summer before his senior year.)

Let’s play a new game of guess the object. Guess the object. Do it.
Hint: wheel

Let’s play a new game of guess the object. Guess the object. Do it.
Hint: wheel

This is what happened to the ellipsoidal lens when a non-theatre person touched the lighting equipment. 

This is what happened to the ellipsoidal lens when a non-theatre person touched the lighting equipment. 

Dry Runs from hell

I was going to have this in a  series of asks but five separate asks to tell a story is ridiculous I’m sorry it’s so long you don’t have to publish it I just wanna tell someone.

So recently I’ve just been thinking a lot about these dry runs from hell we had last year so I figured this is a place I can share the story.

Last year my school did Singin’ in the Rain and we had a really bad night right after opening. We had a matinee the next day and our call time was ten so we could do dry runs. The first one was a regular dry run, headsets, shifting clears, lights, just without the actors. The second was also a regular dry run. We expected that was the last, as we normally have two only if we were especially bad the night before, which we were.

But then we had to go out on stage and do push ups. And then we had the third set of dry runs. This one wasn’t our SM calling warnings standbys and gos over headset like usual, this was our technical director going over ghost mic and simply saying ‘go’ at 20 second intervals. No warnings, no headsets, not even a standby. No time to re-organize units and props in our tiny offstage area (and that show we had so many pieces that about half of them went out the door after being used and putting them outside required quite a bit of maneuvering and quiet heavy lifting very slowly to not make noise). No time to prep for the mammoth rain deck that took twenty seconds to move ten feet at our fastest time. No clears. No stopping. We literally had to keep going after one of the shift crew ate it while running offstage and bloodied up his arm, he was quickly ushered out by the ASM and given the first aid kit (we later got in trouble because he made too much noise while falling). We did each scene over and over again, even when we got it right the first time. And then afterwards we had to go back out on stage again and do more push ups, during which our Tech Director would say “Down. Hold it… hold it… hold it…” stretching it for 20 seconds until he said up. Then again. And again. 

At the end of that everyone was cursing our tech director out, and half of the advanced techies swore to never work a  show under him again (a few of them carried out that promise too), we were all sufficiently pissed.

Looking back on it in hindsight I saw that it was actually a brilliantly evil sadistic way to unify the crew. Before those dry runs we were a loose gathering of people who frequently fought and blamed each other for our mistakes. But after those dry runs he gave us a common enemy, and we united under that banner of hatred against him and came together as a crew bonding over lunch and dinner behind the theater, licking our wounds and complaining.That night we went on to have an awesome show that night for the critic who was coming, and at our post-show meeting we made the Technical Director do push ups with our SM standing on his back as a small form of payback. 

Great story, thanks for sharing!

Hey guys, if you have any advice, please reply/reblog/whatthefrickever!
In basic terms and short pieces of advice:
1. Don’t be afraid to trust the newbies. It’s better to have unexperienced people learn on the job than take on all the projects yourself. As they work, they will learn, if one tech area lacks in a high school performance it’s OK! It’s about the learning experience and having fun. If you’re stressed more than you should be/more than you have been in the past- it isn’t a BAD thing, but it’s not a good thing either. Stress means you care. But over stretching your abilities and time is not worth it. High school comes with homework, outside jobs, and a slight need for socializing and support. 
2. Teaching others is the best way to learn/prove that you know the subject well. Technical theatre does come with limited time and when your only opportunity to work/teach is outside of the school day, things become more difficult. Nonetheless, it is possible.
3. If people on your crew are misbehaving, lay down the rules with them. Have meetings. You’re the stage manager, do what you need to do. People are trusting your judgement. You DO have the power to be harsh, but be careful. A yelling stage manager is NEVER okay. So have patience, be stern, and show your people who’s boss!
4. Depending on what kind of system your theatre program is following, stage managers are above most others in the lay out of company. Whether or not that main focus is over the actors, the technicians, pit, or all of the above, is up to you and the other higher up individuals. Here's a pretty standard visual image of what I'm talking about, (or just google 'theatre positions flowchart.') In most situations, stage managers are only responsible for the actors, but I personally believe in the idea of keeping a check on everyone. For example, the every other day, “What do you need to get your work done this week?” kind of questions are helpful to you, your director, and your individual technician crews.
5. I think a “Tech Olympics” day is a great idea! Practice that ol’ trusty stage management skill of ‘being assertive’ and try to convince your TD that it’s a necessary event that needs to happen.
6. Is your school involved with ITS? (International Thespian Society) Sometimes there are state-wide events that are good opportunities to practice and learn basic tech skills. 

Hey guys, if you have any advice, please reply/reblog/whatthefrickever!

In basic terms and short pieces of advice:

1. Don’t be afraid to trust the newbies. It’s better to have unexperienced people learn on the job than take on all the projects yourself. As they work, they will learn, if one tech area lacks in a high school performance it’s OK! It’s about the learning experience and having fun. If you’re stressed more than you should be/more than you have been in the past- it isn’t a BAD thing, but it’s not a good thing either. Stress means you care. But over stretching your abilities and time is not worth it. High school comes with homework, outside jobs, and a slight need for socializing and support. 

2. Teaching others is the best way to learn/prove that you know the subject well. Technical theatre does come with limited time and when your only opportunity to work/teach is outside of the school day, things become more difficult. Nonetheless, it is possible.

3. If people on your crew are misbehaving, lay down the rules with them. Have meetings. You’re the stage manager, do what you need to do. People are trusting your judgement. You DO have the power to be harsh, but be careful. A yelling stage manager is NEVER okay. So have patience, be stern, and show your people who’s boss!

4. Depending on what kind of system your theatre program is following, stage managers are above most others in the lay out of company. Whether or not that main focus is over the actors, the technicians, pit, or all of the above, is up to you and the other higher up individuals. Here's a pretty standard visual image of what I'm talking about, (or just google 'theatre positions flowchart.') In most situations, stage managers are only responsible for the actors, but I personally believe in the idea of keeping a check on everyone. For example, the every other day, “What do you need to get your work done this week?” kind of questions are helpful to you, your director, and your individual technician crews.

5. I think a “Tech Olympics” day is a great idea! Practice that ol’ trusty stage management skill of ‘being assertive’ and try to convince your TD that it’s a necessary event that needs to happen.

6. Is your school involved with ITS? (International Thespian Society) Sometimes there are state-wide events that are good opportunities to practice and learn basic tech skills. 

Anonymous asked: Hey so I just need to be sassy right now to someone who would feel my pain. Our fall play opens in three days, we have only gone through it start to finish twice (only once with all the lights and sound) and we still dont have all our props or costumes. #freakoutmodeactivated.

http://sassytechcrew.tumblr.com/post/48898831255/coffee-strobe-dance-party-with-only-certain

Go my child, look to the promise land, it will guide you.

Tech crew. Terrible pick-up lines, mischief, nonsensical fun.

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